Episode #27: Thylacine extinction, Sediba and Apollo 17

The 27th episode of Consilience is out! You can download the mp3 here (30.6mb) and the file’s page on Archive.org is here.

Teaching Angela to appreciate History

What a beautiful animal

A rather depressing item this week: on September 7th 1936, the last (known) Thylacine died.  (Although there is the Liz and Gary Doyle footage allegedly showing a thylacine in 1973).

News

Five new papers have been published in Science about Australopithecus sediba.

Let’s collectively facepalm over the latest American public opinion survey about global warming.

John Edward is in South Africa. Edward in all probability does not really converse with dead people, but rather relies on well-known techniques of cold reading.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has taken high-resolution images of the Apollo 17 landing site. Take that Moon Hoaxers.

Quote

From Star Trek: TNG Season 1, “Conspiracy

VADM Aaron: “That’s the charming thing about [a conspiracy], isn’t it? When a machination is real, no one knows about it. And when it’s suspected, it’s almost never real.”

RADM Savar: “Except of course in paranoid delusions for those who believe.”

Announcements

Johannesburg: SpeaktoaScientist.
Durban: Skeptics in the Pub.
Pretoria: Skeptics in the Pub.
Cape Town: Skeptics in the Pub.

We are also planning group visit to the Cradle of Humankind / Sterkfontein Caves for October 8th. Please email us on consiliencecast@gmail.com if you are interested.

http://www.archive.org/details/ConsilienceEpisode27

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About Michael Meadon

Michael Meadon is a graduate student in cognitive science at the University of KwaZulu Natal in Durban, South Africa. When he's not procrastinating online or propitiating his wife, he investigates the effects of rapid & unreflective facial judgments on political elections. He expects to graduate any decade now. When he was an innocent undergrad Michael studied Politics, Philosophy & Economics at the University of Cape Town. Unfortunately, he had to find out for himself that "social" and "science" often don't go so well together.
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